Tuesday, May 26, 2015

What Kind of Person are You?


So, a couple of my students and I had a very interesting conversation the other day about different personalities. We focused specifically on the differences between a highly heart-led/emotional person and an analytic/logical person. One of my students is very interested in the Myers-Briggs personality test and the 16 different personality types. A while back, I took one of these tests and asked my husband to do the same. I had guessed which one I thought he would be and I got it spot on (I really have no reason to point that out other than to toot my own horn, so "toot toot!"). See, Jake? I know you better than you think.

In the interest of objective scientific experimentation, I took a number of free Myers-Briggs personality tests online (4, to be exact, not counting the original test I took months ago). Of the 5 different total tests, I got 5 different results. Initially, I was pretty frustrated. Of course this wouldn't do. I needed a solid answer. So, I started taking notes and analyzing the data. (Although, I will admit that part of me is slightly satisfied that I am mysterious, hard to figure out, and that I can't be easily placed in a box.)


Don't laugh at me yet. And Jake, stop rolling your eyes. I can be analytic when I need to be. . .


I won't give you all the details about this type of personality test other than to tell you it is split into 4 categories and that each category has two opposing personality traits. The test is designed to fit you into one trait for each category. The categories are as follows:


Extroverted vs. Introverted

Sensing vs. iNtuitive
Feeling vs. Thinking
Judging vs. Perceiving

You can see a brief description of the different categories here.


There are 16 possible combinations of those letters. I took the test 5 times and got 5 different results, which were:
ENFP
ENTP
ESFP
ENFJ
ESFJ
So, keeping in line with my objective scientific analysis, I deduced that I was very clearly in the "Extrovert" category (duh...if you've met me, you know this already). Then, I read the descriptions of each of those 5 personality types. From this initial reading, I could immediately rule out the ENTP personality type. There are pieces of it that I identify with, but for the most part it didn't fit me. 

To see a description of each of the 16 personality types, click here.


From there, I looked through each of the 16 traits. I knew I was an extrovert and I was fairly certain that I was a "feeler" as opposed to a "thinker." I scored on the line between "Sensing" and "Intuitive" as well as on the line between "Judging" and "Perceiving." I felt like I leaned more toward the intuitive side (big picture as opposed to details), but I identified with both the "judging" and "perceiving" traits. So, I had to go full picture and I re-read through the descriptions for the ENFP and ENFJ personality types. I decided I fit more in the ENFP mold, which made sense because that was the first result I got. 


I realize that I went way overboard and got a little too obsessive about this personality test. Once again, I'll ask you not to judge me. I like to see things through and I always finish what I start.


Some of the tidbits about my personality type that stuck out the most to me:



  • They love to explore creative possibilities, and nothing deflates them faster than talking about dry facts or harsh reality. (Ahem...Jake, this might be the cause of some communication issues.)
  • The ENFP needs to be given positive assurance and affirmation. More than one ENFP has been known to "go fishing" for compliments. They like to hear from their significant others that they are loved and valued, and are willing and eager to return the favor. (I'm not super proud of this trait, but it's absolutely true about me. I need verbal confirmation.)
  • A problem area for ENFPs in relationships is their dislike of conflict and sensitivity to criticism. They are perfectionists who believe that any form of criticism is a stab at their character, which is very difficult for them to take.
  • Popular hobbies for the ENFP include writing, creating and appreciating art, playing or listening to music, participating in community theater, and reading fiction.
  • High School teacher is one of the most likely jobs listed for an ENFP.
  • Although they are quite sensitive, ENFP's can be guarded when it comes to their deepest feelings.
I thought it was fun to determine my personality type and to analyze how I interact with other personality types. If you want to take a free Myers-Briggs personality test, here are some links you can follow:
If you want to find the Harry Potter character who matches your personality type, go here (I'm Ron). And if you want to find the Disney princess who matches your personality type, go here (I'm Rapunzel).

What Kind of Person are You?


So, a couple of my students and I had a very interesting conversation the other day about different personalities. We focused specifically on the differences between a highly heart-led/emotional person and an analytic/logical person. One of my students is very interested in the Myers-Briggs personality test and the 16 different personality types. A while back, I took one of these tests and asked my husband to do the same. I had guessed which one I thought he would be and I got it spot on (I really have no reason to point that out other than to toot my own horn, so "toot toot!"). See, Jake? I know you better than you think.

In the interest of objective scientific experimentation, I took a number of free Myers-Briggs personality tests online (4, to be exact, not counting the original test I took months ago). Of the 5 different total tests, I got 5 different results. Initially, I was pretty frustrated. Of course this wouldn't do. I needed a solid answer. So, I started taking notes and analyzing the data. (Although, I will admit that part of me is slightly satisfied that I am mysterious, hard to figure out, and that I can't be easily placed in a box.)


Don't laugh at me yet. And Jake, stop rolling your eyes. I can be analytic when I need to be. . .


I won't give you all the details about this type of personality test other than to tell you it is split into 4 categories and that each category has two opposing personality traits. The test is designed to fit you into one trait for each category. The categories are as follows:


Extroverted vs. Introverted

Sensing vs. iNtuitive
Feeling vs. Thinking
Judging vs. Perceiving

You can see a brief description of the different categories here.


There are 16 possible combinations of those letters. I took the test 5 times and got 5 different results, which were:
ENFP
ENTP
ESFP
ENFJ
ESFJ
So, keeping in line with my objective scientific analysis, I deduced that I was very clearly in the "Extrovert" category (duh...if you've met me, you know this already). Then, I read the descriptions of each of those 5 personality types. From this initial reading, I could immediately rule out the ENTP personality type. There are pieces of it that I identify with, but for the most part it didn't fit me. 

To see a description of each of the 16 personality types, click here.


From there, I looked through each of the 16 traits. I knew I was an extrovert and I was fairly certain that I was a "feeler" as opposed to a "thinker." I scored on the line between "Sensing" and "Intuitive" as well as on the line between "Judging" and "Perceiving." I felt like I leaned more toward the intuitive side (big picture as opposed to details), but I identified with both the "judging" and "perceiving" traits. So, I had to go full picture and I re-read through the descriptions for the ENFP and ENFJ personality types. I decided I fit more in the ENFP mold, which made sense because that was the first result I got. 


I realize that I went way overboard and got a little too obsessive about this personality test. Once again, I'll ask you not to judge me. I like to see things through and I always finish what I start.


Some of the tidbits about my personality type that stuck out the most to me:



  • They love to explore creative possibilities, and nothing deflates them faster than talking about dry facts or harsh reality. (Ahem...Jake, this might be the cause of some communication issues.)
  • The ENFP needs to be given positive assurance and affirmation. More than one ENFP has been known to "go fishing" for compliments. They like to hear from their significant others that they are loved and valued, and are willing and eager to return the favor. (I'm not super proud of this trait, but it's absolutely true about me. I need verbal confirmation.)
  • A problem area for ENFPs in relationships is their dislike of conflict and sensitivity to criticism. They are perfectionists who believe that any form of criticism is a stab at their character, which is very difficult for them to take.
  • Popular hobbies for the ENFP include writing, creating and appreciating art, playing or listening to music, participating in community theater, and reading fiction.
  • High School teacher is one of the most likely jobs listed for an ENFP.
  • Although they are quite sensitive, ENFP's can be guarded when it comes to their deepest feelings.
I thought it was fun to determine my personality type and to analyze how I interact with other personality types. If you want to take a free Myers-Briggs personality test, here are some links you can follow:
If you want to find the Harry Potter character who matches your personality type, go here (I'm Ron). And if you want to find the Disney princess who matches your personality type, go here (I'm Rapunzel).

Friday, May 22, 2015

Words of Wisdom from "Little Women"



Little Women is a classic, well-loved, American novel. The themes and issues addressed are timeless. I've read this book three times (don't judge me, I like to read - if you had a favorite movie would you only watch it once?). Call me old fashioned, but I love it. I get caught up in the lives of the characters every time.
There is plenty of wisdom and enjoyment to be gleaned from Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. Here are some of my favorite tidbits.
  • "I like good strong words that mean something." - Jo March
  • "My child, the troubles and temptations of your life are beginning and may be many, but you can overcome and outlive them all if you learn to feel the strength and tenderness of your Heavenly Father as you do that of your earthly one. The more you love and trust Him, the nearer you will feel to Him, and the less you will depend on human power and wisdom. His love and care never tire or change, can never be taken from you, but may become the source of lifelong peace, happiness, and strength. Believe this heartily, and go to God with all your little cares, and hopes, and sins, and sorrows, as freely and confidingly as you come to your mother." - Mrs. March
  • ". . . she had drawn nearer to the Friend who always welcomes every child with a love stronger than that of any father, tenderer than that of any mother." - Narrator
  • "Watch yourself, be the first to ask pardon if you both err, and guard against the little piques, misunderstandings, and hasty words that often pave the way for bitter sorrow and regret." - Mrs. March
  • "A kiss for a blow is always best, though it's not very easy to give it sometimes," - Mrs. March
  • "God was not a blind force, and immortality was not a pretty fable, but a blessed fact." - Jo's realization
  • "Don't neglect husband for children, don't shut him out of the nursery, but teach him how to help in it. His place is there as well as yours, and the children need him." - Mrs. March
  • ". . .I seldom give advice unless I've proved its practicability." - Mrs. March
  • "You men tell us we are angels, and say we can make you what we will, but the instant we honestly try to do you good, you laugh at us and won't listen, which proves how much your flattery is worth." - Amy March
  • "Let the boys be boys, the longer the better, and let the young men sow their wild oats if they must. But mothers, sisters, and friends may help to make the crop a small one, and keep many tares from spoiling the harvest, by believing, and showing that they believe, in the possibility of loyalty to the virtues which make men manliest in good women's eyes." - Narrator
  • "His first wooing had been of the tempestuous order, and he looked back upon it as if through a long vista of years with a feeling of compassion blended with regret. He was not ashamed of it, but put it away as one of the bitter-sweet experiences of his life, for which he could be grateful when the pain was over." - Narrator
  • "It's highly virtuous to say we'll be good, but we can't do it all at once. . ." - Narrator
  • "It's very curious, but the more I try to satisfy myself with all sorts of natural affections, the more I seem to want. I'd no idea hearts could take in so many." - Jo March
  • ". . .girls in their bloom should remember that they too may miss the blossom time. That rosy cheeks don't last forever . . . and that, by and by, kindness and respect will be as sweet as love and admiration now." - Narrator
  • "Gentlemen . . . be courteous to the old maids, no matter how poor and plain and prim, for the only chivalry worth having is that which is the readiest to pay deference to the old, protect the feeble, and serve womankind, regardless of rank, age, or color." - Narrator
  • "It's not half so sensible to leave legacies when one dies as it is to use the money wisely while alive, and enjoy making one's fellow creatures happy with it." - Laurie 
  • "I do think that families are the most beautiful things in all the world!" - Jo March

Words of Wisdom from "Little Women"



Little Women is a classic, well-loved, American novel. The themes and issues addressed are timeless. I've read this book three times (don't judge me, I like to read - if you had a favorite movie would you only watch it once?). Call me old fashioned, but I love it. I get caught up in the lives of the characters every time.
There is plenty of wisdom and enjoyment to be gleaned from Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. Here are some of my favorite tidbits.
  • "I like good strong words that mean something." - Jo March
  • "My child, the troubles and temptations of your life are beginning and may be many, but you can overcome and outlive them all if you learn to feel the strength and tenderness of your Heavenly Father as you do that of your earthly one. The more you love and trust Him, the nearer you will feel to Him, and the less you will depend on human power and wisdom. His love and care never tire or change, can never be taken from you, but may become the source of lifelong peace, happiness, and strength. Believe this heartily, and go to God with all your little cares, and hopes, and sins, and sorrows, as freely and confidingly as you come to your mother." - Mrs. March
  • ". . . she had drawn nearer to the Friend who always welcomes every child with a love stronger than that of any father, tenderer than that of any mother." - Narrator
  • "Watch yourself, be the first to ask pardon if you both err, and guard against the little piques, misunderstandings, and hasty words that often pave the way for bitter sorrow and regret." - Mrs. March
  • "A kiss for a blow is always best, though it's not very easy to give it sometimes," - Mrs. March
  • "God was not a blind force, and immortality was not a pretty fable, but a blessed fact." - Jo's realization
  • "Don't neglect husband for children, don't shut him out of the nursery, but teach him how to help in it. His place is there as well as yours, and the children need him." - Mrs. March
  • ". . .I seldom give advice unless I've proved its practicability." - Mrs. March
  • "You men tell us we are angels, and say we can make you what we will, but the instant we honestly try to do you good, you laugh at us and won't listen, which proves how much your flattery is worth." - Amy March
  • "Let the boys be boys, the longer the better, and let the young men sow their wild oats if they must. But mothers, sisters, and friends may help to make the crop a small one, and keep many tares from spoiling the harvest, by believing, and showing that they believe, in the possibility of loyalty to the virtues which make men manliest in good women's eyes." - Narrator
  • "His first wooing had been of the tempestuous order, and he looked back upon it as if through a long vista of years with a feeling of compassion blended with regret. He was not ashamed of it, but put it away as one of the bitter-sweet experiences of his life, for which he could be grateful when the pain was over." - Narrator
  • "It's highly virtuous to say we'll be good, but we can't do it all at once. . ." - Narrator
  • "It's very curious, but the more I try to satisfy myself with all sorts of natural affections, the more I seem to want. I'd no idea hearts could take in so many." - Jo March
  • ". . .girls in their bloom should remember that they too may miss the blossom time. That rosy cheeks don't last forever . . . and that, by and by, kindness and respect will be as sweet as love and admiration now." - Narrator
  • "Gentlemen . . . be courteous to the old maids, no matter how poor and plain and prim, for the only chivalry worth having is that which is the readiest to pay deference to the old, protect the feeble, and serve womankind, regardless of rank, age, or color." - Narrator
  • "It's not half so sensible to leave legacies when one dies as it is to use the money wisely while alive, and enjoy making one's fellow creatures happy with it." - Laurie 
  • "I do think that families are the most beautiful things in all the world!" - Jo March

Monday, May 18, 2015

Letter to a High School Graduate

Dear Anna,

I can't believe you are done with high school. That's absolutely crazy, because yesterday you were following me around in a ridiculous princess outfit and plastic Cinderella play shoes. Yesterday you still needed floaties in the pool and thought that if you ever left my side you would be missing out on something awesome (which usually wasn't the case, kudos to you for eventually figuring that out). 

I have watched you grow into a beautiful young lady. Seriously, how do you eat at Taco Bell every day and have a figure like that? Enjoy that metabolism while you still can.

You truly are a beautiful person, inside and out. I'm impressed every day by your maturity and your individuality. You don't care what people think of you, peer pressure doesn't have much of an effect on you, and you don't embarrass easily. Those qualities will definitely come in handy in college. 

I'm excited for you. I'm excited for you to have a whole set of new experiences. You'll make mistakes, some bigger than others, but you'll learn from them and grow into a better person because of them. You'll lose friends, but you'll gain twice as many. You'll miss having mom to do your laundry, and cook your dinner, and remind you that no, it is not a good idea to post a picture of your debit card on Twitter no matter how cute the picture on the card is. But you learn so much when you are forced to do things on your own. 

Don't skip church. Make friends in a college community group and have like-minded people to keep you accountable. Remember that you represent Christ in all you do, but don't let this make you self-righteous or judgmental. Remember that Jesus loved the adulteress and the woman at the well as much as he loved his disciples. You will meet people from all different backgrounds and walks of life. Remember that not everyone was raised the same way you were, and that sometimes showing the love of Christ is the most effective way to reach someone. And remember that if you slide, I'll still love you. You are about to enter a part of your life that requires you to have a faith all your own. You can't borrow faith from Mom and Dad anymore. It has to be all you, which is an idea that didn't make sense to me until I was where you were; but your faith will be that much stronger because it will be your own

If you stumble and fall, don't convince yourself that you are messed up or worthless. You are worth more than you know. I'm here and I always will be. I am a phone call away and I can talk you through the good times and the bad. I won't have all the answers, but I will listen as much as you need me to. 

You are about to have so much fun. Remember that high school doesn't matter as much as you think it does, and things get so much better. 

I love you and I'm so proud of you,

Sissy


Letter to a High School Graduate

Dear Anna,

I can't believe you are done with high school. That's absolutely crazy, because yesterday you were following me around in a ridiculous princess outfit and plastic Cinderella play shoes. Yesterday you still needed floaties in the pool and thought that if you ever left my side you would be missing out on something awesome (which usually wasn't the case, kudos to you for eventually figuring that out). 

I have watched you grow into a beautiful young lady. Seriously, how do you eat at Taco Bell every day and have a figure like that? Enjoy that metabolism while you still can.

You truly are a beautiful person, inside and out. I'm impressed every day by your maturity and your individuality. You don't care what people think of you, peer pressure doesn't have much of an effect on you, and you don't embarrass easily. Those qualities will definitely come in handy in college. 

I'm excited for you. I'm excited for you to have a whole set of new experiences. You'll make mistakes, some bigger than others, but you'll learn from them and grow into a better person because of them. You'll lose friends, but you'll gain twice as many. You'll miss having mom to do your laundry, and cook your dinner, and remind you that no, it is not a good idea to post a picture of your debit card on Twitter no matter how cute the picture on the card is. But you learn so much when you are forced to do things on your own. 

Don't skip church. Make friends in a college community group and have like-minded people to keep you accountable. Remember that you represent Christ in all you do, but don't let this make you self-righteous or judgmental. Remember that Jesus loved the adulteress and the woman at the well as much as he loved his disciples. You will meet people from all different backgrounds and walks of life. Remember that not everyone was raised the same way you were, and that sometimes showing the love of Christ is the most effective way to reach someone. And remember that if you slide, I'll still love you. You are about to enter a part of your life that requires you to have a faith all your own. You can't borrow faith from Mom and Dad anymore. It has to be all you, which is an idea that didn't make sense to me until I was where you were; but your faith will be that much stronger because it will be your own

If you stumble and fall, don't convince yourself that you are messed up or worthless. You are worth more than you know. I'm here and I always will be. I am a phone call away and I can talk you through the good times and the bad. I won't have all the answers, but I will listen as much as you need me to. 

You are about to have so much fun. Remember that high school doesn't matter as much as you think it does, and things get so much better. 

I love you and I'm so proud of you,

Sissy


Thursday, May 14, 2015

Childhood Nostalgia

My little sister is graduating high school, my baby brother is graduating college and getting married and lately I've been finding myself caught up in a lot of sweet memories. Nostalgia can be a good friend to have when utilized properly and a dangerous enemy when it causes us to look back on things that appear better than they actually were. In this instance I'll enjoy the memories of my childhood with Logue and Anna (and later, Jami). Thinking of growing up got me thinking about some of my favorite things when I was a kid. So, without further adieu, here are some of the best of the best things for a girl of the late 90's/early 2000's:




American Girl 
Who doesn't remember American Girl dolls? Each one came with her own story. A doll AND a book series? It's like they were made specifically for me. Each of these dolls told a story about a different era of American history from the perspective of a girl that any 10 year old could relate to. Who could forget Samatha, Josephina, Felicity, Molly, Addy, and Kit? Actually, I think I still have Josephina somewhere in a closet at my parents house, along with the matching nightgown set that Mamaw made so that Samantha and I could rock our floor-length matching pajamas in style.

Bitty Baby
Bitty Baby was part of the American Girl family. You could customize the way she looked and she always came with her own little teddy bear. Bitty Baby had an outfit and accessories for every occasion. She had her own carrier and diaper bag and suitcase so that she could go everywhere with you. Even a 5 minute trip to church or a friend's house meant I had to pack a full suitcase for Bitty Baby, not to mention long road trips to visit Aunt Ann, my cousin Katy and Mamaw. And I had to make sure to have the latest in all Bitty Baby fashion so that Katy and I could compare Bitty Baby Couture. It was serious business, people.

My Size Barbie
Who wouldn't want a barbie doll they could share clothes with? She wasn't much good for playing with, but she was great for practicing your braiding skills and she came with a combo ballerina/princess dress and slippers. My Size Barbies got more sophisticated as time went on. I remember by the time my younger sister was in her Barbie phase she had a Rapunzel version. Not the Disney "Tangled" Rapunzel either, this was before her time. This Rapunzel was from the "Barbie as Rapunzel" movie and she had a detachable Rapunzel-length braid that you could attach to your own hair. I did it once as a joke and went to flip my hair around and that dang thing was so heavy I went further than expected and knocked my head on the door frame. Not one of my proudest moments.

Tamagotchi
When I was in elementary school - probably between 2nd and 3rd grade - Tamagotchis were all the rage. You'd actually be surprised at how hard those suckers were to keep alive. I remember my 3rd grade teacher, Mrs. Overall, getting on to some of us for taking out our Tamagotchi's to feed them. They were the cell phones of that time period. We obsessed over them at lunch and recess. We tried to see who could keep her Tamagotchi alive the longest. We sincerely believed that if we killed our Tamagotchi then we were destined to be a terrible mother. 

Jelly Sandals
Jelly sandals were the most coveted of all the footwear options. Some people even wore them in the winter with colorful socks. They made the most obnoxious clacking and scraping noises when you walked on any hard surfaces, and they were the most uncomfortable shoes EVER! My jelly sandals gave me blisters pretty much everywhere they touched my feet. I'm glad that fad didn't last long because I'm not sure my feet could've taken much more.

Projector
This may have just been a trend with my friends and I growing up, but it was a pretty big part of my childhood all the same. I had an older cousin who wanted to be a teacher from a young age (and she actually grew up to be one). She asked for an overhead projector from Santa for Christmas one year and I thought it was the coolest toy I had ever played with. So, naturally, I had to have one of my own. The next Christmas I got my own overhead projector from Santa. I spent hours playing "teacher" with my friends. Of course those projectors are now a bit outdated, but back then it was cool to play teacher with the exact same tool that our teachers used every day. It made the experience that much more authentic. 

Dollhouses
I chose these images very carefully, because these two dollhouses were the exact ones that I had. The family pictured above lived in the pink house, complete with another sister, brother, and twin baby girls (they were big families because I had lots of dolls but only two houses, I wasn't going to make anyone homeless!). There was another family who lived in the blue house. They were neighbors and the younger brothers were best friends. The twin babies got into all kinds of shenanigans and the older sisters were initially enemies, but they soon got over that and became inseparable. The story line was very well thought out and detailed. I could occupy myself for hours with these two dollhouses. 

Talk With Me Barbie
This Barbie was pretty revolutionary for her time. She came with a CD and you could use the CD to download a program on your computer that allowed you to program Barbie to say what you wanted. Her mouth would actually move when she talked to you! Obviously, this Barbie has gotten much more sophisticated over time, but back when I got the "Talk With Me Barbie" she was pretty technologically advanced. That being said, she never did work the way she was supposed to. . .

My First Cell Phone
This beautiful piece of engineering was my very first cell phone. It looks like an ancient piece of technology, doesn't it? Seriously, this thing probably belongs in a museum. It didn't have a camera, I couldn't text, it certainly didn't have internet or GPS, and if I wanted it to play a song for a ringtone I had to pay $0.99.   

MSN Messenger
I believe the slogan for this instant messaging service was "the future of Messenger." This was the premier means of communication from middle school all the way through the first half of high school. My friends and I always used MSN Messenger, but when I moved to Arkansas I learned that everyone here used AOL Instant Messenger. (For the record, MSN was better). I changed the emoticons on my screen name at least once a week. Of course, texting and the evolution of social media and iPhones gradually made this an archaic and unnecessary resource, but it was fun while it lasted.

Childhood Nostalgia

My little sister is graduating high school, my baby brother is graduating college and getting married and lately I've been finding myself caught up in a lot of sweet memories. Nostalgia can be a good friend to have when utilized properly and a dangerous enemy when it causes us to look back on things that appear better than they actually were. In this instance I'll enjoy the memories of my childhood with Logue and Anna (and later, Jami). Thinking of growing up got me thinking about some of my favorite things when I was a kid. So, without further adieu, here are some of the best of the best things for a girl of the late 90's/early 2000's:




American Girl 
Who doesn't remember American Girl dolls? Each one came with her own story. A doll AND a book series? It's like they were made specifically for me. Each of these dolls told a story about a different era of American history from the perspective of a girl that any 10 year old could relate to. Who could forget Samatha, Josephina, Felicity, Molly, Addy, and Kit? Actually, I think I still have Josephina somewhere in a closet at my parents house, along with the matching nightgown set that Mamaw made so that Samantha and I could rock our floor-length matching pajamas in style.

Bitty Baby
Bitty Baby was part of the American Girl family. You could customize the way she looked and she always came with her own little teddy bear. Bitty Baby had an outfit and accessories for every occasion. She had her own carrier and diaper bag and suitcase so that she could go everywhere with you. Even a 5 minute trip to church or a friend's house meant I had to pack a full suitcase for Bitty Baby, not to mention long road trips to visit Aunt Ann, my cousin Katy and Mamaw. And I had to make sure to have the latest in all Bitty Baby fashion so that Katy and I could compare Bitty Baby Couture. It was serious business, people.

My Size Barbie
Who wouldn't want a barbie doll they could share clothes with? She wasn't much good for playing with, but she was great for practicing your braiding skills and she came with a combo ballerina/princess dress and slippers. My Size Barbies got more sophisticated as time went on. I remember by the time my younger sister was in her Barbie phase she had a Rapunzel version. Not the Disney "Tangled" Rapunzel either, this was before her time. This Rapunzel was from the "Barbie as Rapunzel" movie and she had a detachable Rapunzel-length braid that you could attach to your own hair. I did it once as a joke and went to flip my hair around and that dang thing was so heavy I went further than expected and knocked my head on the door frame. Not one of my proudest moments.

Tamagotchi
When I was in elementary school - probably between 2nd and 3rd grade - Tamagotchis were all the rage. You'd actually be surprised at how hard those suckers were to keep alive. I remember my 3rd grade teacher, Mrs. Overall, getting on to some of us for taking out our Tamagotchi's to feed them. They were the cell phones of that time period. We obsessed over them at lunch and recess. We tried to see who could keep her Tamagotchi alive the longest. We sincerely believed that if we killed our Tamagotchi then we were destined to be a terrible mother. 

Jelly Sandals
Jelly sandals were the most coveted of all the footwear options. Some people even wore them in the winter with colorful socks. They made the most obnoxious clacking and scraping noises when you walked on any hard surfaces, and they were the most uncomfortable shoes EVER! My jelly sandals gave me blisters pretty much everywhere they touched my feet. I'm glad that fad didn't last long because I'm not sure my feet could've taken much more.

Projector
This may have just been a trend with my friends and I growing up, but it was a pretty big part of my childhood all the same. I had an older cousin who wanted to be a teacher from a young age (and she actually grew up to be one). She asked for an overhead projector from Santa for Christmas one year and I thought it was the coolest toy I had ever played with. So, naturally, I had to have one of my own. The next Christmas I got my own overhead projector from Santa. I spent hours playing "teacher" with my friends. Of course those projectors are now a bit outdated, but back then it was cool to play teacher with the exact same tool that our teachers used every day. It made the experience that much more authentic. 

Dollhouses
I chose these images very carefully, because these two dollhouses were the exact ones that I had. The family pictured above lived in the pink house, complete with another sister, brother, and twin baby girls (they were big families because I had lots of dolls but only two houses, I wasn't going to make anyone homeless!). There was another family who lived in the blue house. They were neighbors and the younger brothers were best friends. The twin babies got into all kinds of shenanigans and the older sisters were initially enemies, but they soon got over that and became inseparable. The story line was very well thought out and detailed. I could occupy myself for hours with these two dollhouses. 

Talk With Me Barbie
This Barbie was pretty revolutionary for her time. She came with a CD and you could use the CD to download a program on your computer that allowed you to program Barbie to say what you wanted. Her mouth would actually move when she talked to you! Obviously, this Barbie has gotten much more sophisticated over time, but back when I got the "Talk With Me Barbie" she was pretty technologically advanced. That being said, she never did work the way she was supposed to. . .

My First Cell Phone
This beautiful piece of engineering was my very first cell phone. It looks like an ancient piece of technology, doesn't it? Seriously, this thing probably belongs in a museum. It didn't have a camera, I couldn't text, it certainly didn't have internet or GPS, and if I wanted it to play a song for a ringtone I had to pay $0.99.   

MSN Messenger
I believe the slogan for this instant messaging service was "the future of Messenger." This was the premier means of communication from middle school all the way through the first half of high school. My friends and I always used MSN Messenger, but when I moved to Arkansas I learned that everyone here used AOL Instant Messenger. (For the record, MSN was better). I changed the emoticons on my screen name at least once a week. Of course, texting and the evolution of social media and iPhones gradually made this an archaic and unnecessary resource, but it was fun while it lasted.